Original Research

Operational nursing managers’ experiences of clinical supervision at a Johannesburg Hospital

Bonginkosi I. Shongwe, Charlene Downing, Sanele Nene
Curationis | Vol 47, No 1 | a2521 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v47i1.2521 | © 2024 Bonginkosi I. Shongwe, Charlene Downing, Sanele Nene | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 July 2023 | Published: 24 May 2024

About the author(s)

Bonginkosi I. Shongwe, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Charlene Downing, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Sanele Nene, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Clinical supervision is pivotal in supporting nurses in rendering quality, safe patient care. Therefore, it is essential to understand clinical supervision from operational nursing managers’ context to define existing challenges and propose suitable recommendations.

Objectives: This study aimed to explore and describe operational nursing managers’ experiences of clinical supervision within the context of an academic hospital in Gauteng province and propose evidence-based practice recommendations to improve patient safety and the quality of clinical supervision.

Method: An exploratory, sequential, mixed-method design was used and implemented over two phases to take advantage of the strengths of both the qualitative and quantitative research designs. Unstructured individual interviews were conducted to collect data in phase one, and an adapted Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) questionnaire was used to collect data in phase two.

Results: Operational nursing managers work in stressful conditions and environments with a gross shortage of staff and tools of the trade while being expected to deliver high-quality and safe nursing care. Of the sampled respondents, 36% (n = 17) were dissatisfied with the supervision they received, while 64% (n = 30) were indifferent in the sense that they did not think it was adequate or inadequate.

Conclusion: Clinical supervisors should be trained and supported in clinical supervision, with regular workshops on interpersonal relations.

Contribution: A clearer understanding of clinical supervision within the hospital context and evidence-based practice recommendations to improve patient safety and the quality of clinical supervision.


Keywords

clinical supervision; managers; public hospital; mixed method research design; patient safety

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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