Original Research

A retrospective audit of nursing-related morbidity recorded in a state hospital in KwaZulu-Natal

Spumelelo P Nyide, Petra Brysiewicz, John Bruce, Damian L Clarke
Curationis | Vol 42, No 1 | a1969 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v42i1.1969 | © 2019 Spumelelo P. Nyide, Petra Brysiewicz, John Bruce, Damian L. Clarke | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 29 May 2018 | Published: 27 March 2019

About the author(s)

Spumelelo P Nyide, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Petra Brysiewicz, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
John Bruce, Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service, Department of Surgery, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
Damian L Clarke, Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service, Department of Surgery, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: Health care professionals are expected to deliver safe and effective health services; however there is increased realisation that adverse events in the health system are a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

Objectives: To conduct a retrospective audit of nursing-related morbidities in a state hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Method: A retrospective audit of nursing-related morbidities documented by the surgical service was carried out using the Hybrid Electronic Medical Registry data for a period of 3 years – 01 November 2013 to 31 October 2016.

Results: There were a total of 12 444 admissions to surgical service during the study period, with 461 nursing-related morbidities reported. There was an increase in the number of documented nursing-related morbidities noted during November 2015 to October 2016, with 79% of all reported nursing-related morbidities documented during this period. A total of 54% of nursing-related morbidities were associated with males (n = 248) and 46% (n = 213) with females. The most commonly documented nursing-related morbidity was drugs/medication (n = 167, 36%) with the second most common being adjunct management (n = 130, 28%).

Conclusion: The study has identified the most commonly documented nursing-related morbidities in the surgical service of a state hospital. The findings of the study could provide direction for further research and educational initiatives.


Keywords

Nursing related morbidity; adverse events; KwaZulu-Natal

Metrics

Total abstract views: 235
Total article views: 208


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.