Original Research

Guidelines to reduce sexually trasmitted infections at primary health care centres - Part 2

S.T.J. Molapo, T.M.M. Maja, S.C.D. Wright
Curationis | Vol 30, No 4 | a1114 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v30i4.1114 | © 2007 S.T.J. Molapo, T.M.M. Maja, S.C.D. Wright | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 28 September 2007 | Published: 28 September 2007

About the author(s)

S.T.J. Molapo, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
T.M.M. Maja, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
S.C.D. Wright, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa

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Abstract

Sexually transmitted diseases are the second highest cause of death among women aged 15-44 years. The incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases is on the increase at many health care centres despite their dreadfulness and many preventative measures. According to the Scope of Practice of registered professional nurses working in a community health clinic, the registered professional nurse has a responsibility to prevent disease and promote health as well as do research. This paper aims to describe guidelines to reduce sexually transmitted infections at primary health care centres based on research done to investigate the community specific knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding sexually transmitted infections. Structured interviews were used to collect data from 1694 participants (males and females) who were consulted at a primary health care clinic in Mamelodi, Gauteng province. Existing patients’ records were also utilised to calculate the incidence rate of sexually transmitted infections. Data were computerised and analysed quantitatively to reflect the results in frequencies and percentages as reported in Part 1 of this research. Guidelines to direct the practice of registered professional nurse were developed based on the findings of the results. These guidelines must underpin community specific interventions to reduce the incidence of sexually.

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