Original Research

Indigenous practices of pregnant women at Dilokong hospital in Limpopo province, South Africa

Mamagoro A. Mogawane, Tebogo M. Mothiba, Rambelani N. Malema
Curationis | Vol 38, No 2 | a1553 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v38i2.1553 | © 2015 Mamagoro A. Mogawane, Tebogo M. Mothiba, Rambelani N. Malema | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 11 May 2015 | Published: 17 December 2015

About the author(s)

Mamagoro A. Mogawane, Department of Nursing Science, University of Limpopo, South Africa
Tebogo M. Mothiba, Department of Nursing Science, University of Limpopo, South Africa
Rambelani N. Malema, Department of Nursing Science, University of Limpopo, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Indigenous practices (IPs) are experiences generated by people who are living in a specific regional context and cultural group. IPs are shaped by cultural traits that are passed from one generation to the next. IPs practices are rooted and embedded in society and, therefore, the practices become part of the people’s lifestyle. It is difficult to try and change these practices as people have adhered to them throughout their entire lives. The believe system plays a major role in health care seeking behaviour of individuals because they are informed by the IPs that are observed in their environment.

Objectives: To explore and describe the IPs of pregnant women at Dilokong hospital in Limpopo province.

Method: A qualitative, descriptive, explorative and contextual research design was used for the participants to describe the IPs used by pregnant women. Data were collected through unstructured one-on-one interviews.

Results: The following four themes with sub-themes emerged from the data: IPs based on ancestral knowledge; IPs based on spiritual diviners versus church principles; restricted practices versus instructions followed during pregnancy; and labour and IPs during labour and delivery.

Conclusion: IPs are regarded as an honourable health intervention by traditional health practitioners (THPs), families and pregnant women. IPs like cords around women’s waists are still observed during physical examinations. However, there is a reduction of prescribed indigenous oral medication used to accelerate labour because of their potential toxicity.


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