Original Research

Access to information and decision making on teenage pregnancy prevention by females in Tshwane

J.P.F. Masemola-Yende, Sanah M. Mataboge
Curationis | Vol 38, No 2 | a1540 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v38i2.1540 | © 2015 J.P.F. Masemola-Yende, Sanah M. Mataboge | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 11 May 2015 | Published: 05 November 2015

About the author(s)

J.P.F. Masemola-Yende, Department of Nursing Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa
Sanah M. Mataboge, Department of Nursing Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: The increase in the number of teenage pregnancies and its negative consequences has encouraged various researchers to explore the possible causes of teenage pregnancy. Findings from previously-conducted research have indicated different preventable factors that predispose female teenagers to pregnancy, such as staff attitudes and the lack of information resulting from poor access to health facilities.

Objective: To explore and describe access to information and decision making on teenage pregnancy prevention by females using a primary healthcare clinic in Tshwane, South Africa.

Method: In this study, the researchers used a descriptive qualitative and exploratory research design to explore and describe the verbal reports regarding prevention of teenage pregnancy by females using a primary healthcare clinic in Tshwane, South Africa. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 female participants aged between 15 and 26, who had been pregnant once or more during their teens.

Results: Two themes emerged, namely, access to information and decision making by female teenagers. Five categories that emerged were: access to information on pregnancy prevention; ignoring of provided information; the use of alternative medicine with hormonal contraception; personal reasons for use and non-use of contraception; and decisions made by teenagers to not fall pregnant. Females in this study fell pregnant in their teens, even though they had access to information.

Conclusion: Given the complexity of this problem, female teenagers should use their families as primary sources of information for reproductive health promotion and educational institutions should build on this to aid the prevention of teenage pregnancy.


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