Original Research

Audiovisual education and breastfeeding practices: A preliminary report

V. C. Nikodem, G. J. Hofmeyr, T. R. Kramer, A. M. Gülmezoglu, A. Anderson
Curationis | Vol 16, No 4 | a1418 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v16i4.1418 | © 1993 V. C. Nikodem, G. J. Hofmeyr, T. R. Kramer, A. M. Gülmezoglu, A. Anderson | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 March 1993 | Published: 31 March 1993

About the author(s)

V. C. Nikodem,, South Africa
G. J. Hofmeyr,, South Africa
T. R. Kramer,, South Africa
A. M. Gülmezoglu,, South Africa
A. Anderson,, South Africa

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Abstract

A randomized control trial was conducted at the Coronation Hospital, to evaluate the effect of audiovisual breastfeeding education. Within 72 hours after delivery, 340 women who agreed to participate were allocated randomly to view one of two video programmes, one of which dealt with breastfeeding. To determine the effect of the programme on infant feeding a structured questionnaire was administered to 108 women who attended the six week postnatal check-up. Alternative methods, such as telephonic interviews (24) and home visits (30) were used to obtain information from subjects who did not attend the postnatal clinic. Comparisons of mother-infant relationships and postpartum depression showed no significant differences. Similar proportions of each group reported that their baby was easy to manage, and that they felt close to and could communicate well with it. While the overall number of mothers who breast-fed was not significantly different between the two groups, there was a trend towards fewer mothers in the study group supplementing with bottle feeding. It was concluded that the effectiveness of aidiovisual education alone is limited, and attention should be directed towards personal follow-up and support for breastfeeding mothers.

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