Original Research

Knowledge, attitudes and practices toward breast cancer screening in a rural South African community

Dorah U. Ramathuba, Confidence T. Ratshirumbi, Tshilidzi M. Mashamba
Curationis | Vol 38, No 1 | a1172 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v38i1.1172 | © 2015 Dorah U. Ramathuba, Confidence T. Ratshirumbi, Tshilidzi M. Mashamba | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 25 April 2013 | Published: 27 February 2015

About the author(s)

Dorah U. Ramathuba, Department of Advanced Nursing, University of Venda, South Africa
Confidence T. Ratshirumbi, Department of Psychology, University of Venda, South Africa
Tshilidzi M. Mashamba, Department of Psychology, University of Venda, South Africa


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Abstract

Objectives: The study assessed the knowledge, attitudes and breast cancer screening practices amongst women aged 30–65 years residing in a rural South African community.

Method: A quantitative, descriptive cross-sectional design was used and a systematic sampling technique was employed to select 150 participants. The questionnaire was pretested for validity and consistency. Ethical considerations were adhered to in protecting the rights of participants. Thereafter, data were collected and analysed descriptively using the Predictive Analytics Software program.

Results: Findings revealed that the level of knowledge about breast cancer of women in Makwarani Community was relatively low. The attitude toward breast cancer was negative whereas the majority of women had never performed breast cancer diagnostic methods.

Conclusion: Health education on breast cancer screening practices is lacking and the knowledge deficit can contribute negatively to early detection of breast cancer and compound late detection. Based on the findings, community-based intervention was recommended in order to bridge the knowledge gap


Keywords

Knowledge, attitudes, Practices, Breast cancer,

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