Original Research

Job satisfaction of registered nurses in a community hospital in the Limpopo Province in South Africa

H.P.P. Kekana, E.A. du Rand, N.C. van Wyk
Curationis | Vol 30, No 2 | a1068 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/curationis.v30i2.1068 | © 2007 H.P.P. Kekana, E.A. du Rand, N.C. van Wyk | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 28 September 2007 | Published: 28 September 2007

About the author(s)

H.P.P. Kekana, University of Pretoria, South Africa
E.A. du Rand, Department of Nursing Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa
N.C. van Wyk, Department of Nursing Science, University of Pretoria, South Africa

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Abstract

Nurses are confronted daily with the demands of an increased workload and insufficient facilities in the public healthcare sector in South Africa. The purpose o f the study was therefore to determine the degree of job satisfaction of registered nurses in a community hospital in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. A quantitative descriptive design was used to meet the objectives of the study. The population was not sampled because of the small size of it. All the registered nurses who had one or more years experience in this hospital were included in the study. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from them regarding the working conditions in the hospital including the emotional and social climate. The questionnaire was based on an instrument developed by Humphries and Turner (1989:303) to determine the degree o f job satisfaction of nursing staff in a unit for elderly mentally retarded patients. The findings indicated that the majority of the respondents were dissatisfied about the working conditions and emotional climate in the hospital while they were fairly satisfied with the social climate. The workload and degree of fair remuneration, under the working conditions, were the most highly rated as dissatisfying (83% o f the participants) while under the emotional climate they indicated that the pressure under which they worked was highly dissatisfying (82% o f the participants). As the results indicated that the social climate was satisfactory; having a best friend at work and the chance to help other people while at work, were rated positively by 88% and 76% of the participants respectively.

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